Nominations are now open for the fifth annual Provincial Nesika Awards and British Columbians are encouraged to participate. Five categories are open for nomination – Individual, Business, Organization, Youth and, new this year, Multicultural Excellence in Government.
For more information or to nominate, download the nomination form or nominate online.
Nominations close February 10, 2014, 5 pm. 

Nominations are now open for the fifth annual Provincial Nesika Awards and British Columbians are encouraged to participate. Five categories are open for nomination – Individual, Business, Organization, Youth and, new this year, Multicultural Excellence in Government.

For more information or to nominate, download the nomination form or nominate online.

Nominations close February 10, 2014, 5 pm. 

Make A Case Against Racism student artwork
Make A Case Against Racism student artwork

On March 21, 1960 in Sharpeville, South Africa, police killed 69 people who were peacefully demonstrating against pass laws. Pass laws were legislated by the government of South Africa to segregate the white and non-white citizens by regulating the movement of black Africans in urban areas. The pass laws were a dominant feature of the country’s apartheid system.
The United Nations proclaimed the International Day for the Elimination of Racial Discrimination in 1966.
Every year, the Province of British Columbia recognizes and proclaims March 21 as a day where communities can come together in an effort to eliminate all forms of racial discrimination.

Make A Case Against Racism student artwork

On March 21, 1960 in Sharpeville, South Africa, police killed 69 people who were peacefully demonstrating against pass laws. Pass laws were legislated by the government of South Africa to segregate the white and non-white citizens by regulating the movement of black Africans in urban areas. The pass laws were a dominant feature of the country’s apartheid system.

The United Nations proclaimed the International Day for the Elimination of Racial Discrimination in 1966.

Every year, the Province of British Columbia recognizes and proclaims March 21 as a day where communities can come together in an effort to eliminate all forms of racial discrimination.

Make A Case Against Racism student artwork
Make A Case Against Racism student artwork
Make A Case Against Racism student artwork
Make A Case Against Racism student artwork

Every year, the third week of November in British Columbia is proclaimed as Multiculturalism Week. This year, to help celebrate and acknowledge multiculturalism in British Columbia, EmbraceBC is hosted an interactive public art installation at Robson Square in Vancouver from November 18-24, 2012.

This installation took the form of a Maple Tree that symbolized how as British Columbians we each have strong cultural roots that are wide spread, but which come together as a beautiful, unified icon at the surface. People will be encouraged to think about and share how they live multiculturalism in their daily lives, at home, at work, or at school, and record their thoughts on colourful leaves that will be added to the tree branches to make the tree blossom throughout the week.

At the end of the week the tree was planted in Stanley Park and a living monument to multiculturalism in British Columbia.

Make A Case Against Racism student artwork

From the Sunshine Coast? Check out Faces of the Coast, a group of individuals and organizations coming together to take action and raise awareness about discrimination and hate on the Sunshine Coast. 

Make A Case Against Racism student artwork
Make A Case Against Racism student artwork
Make A Case Against Racism student artwork
Make A Case Against Racism student artwork